I write fanfic and make vids. You can also find me on livejournal/dreamwidth, AO3, youtube (as astolatvids), and twitter (as @intimations).


Posts tagged ao3


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Jul 9, 2014
@ 4:22 pm
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123 notes

http://cactusspatz.tumblr.com/post/91097592800/arsenicjade-bleizunge-replied-to-your »

So first comes the part where I remind you guys that the entire AO3 has been built and is maintained by unpaid volunteers.

It may sound easy to add in an opt-out. It is not. Customization like this is costly both in terms of maintenance and testing (the code gets messier, you now have to maintain/test both the standard and customized versions) and performance (because you have to do an extra check on the customization setting every time you display something).

In addition, the opt-outs that we did add (mostly early on before we learned better) are used so minimally that the cost is completely out of proportion to the benefit. 

As far as kudos specifically, having a single-click feedback option is important for those with physical constraints or cognitive disabilities that make typing out a comment a significant effort, those on devices that make typing hard, those whose writing skills in the author’s language are limited even if they can read the story, as well as those who have issues about leaving comments. The balance of benefit is heavily on the side of having them.

If you don’t like kudos, I suggest adding an end note saying something like, “I really appreciate comments instead of kudos if that’s feasible for you.” I imagine that most readers who see that will either be happy to leave you a comment or just skip the kudos, and those that do hit the kudos, you can assume that they needed that option. 

And/or, you can use the AO3 skin system and write an AO3 skin that hides kudos entirely, which you can then maintain for yourself. Here’s a five-second quick & dirty version that takes out all the stats and the kudos block: 

.stats {
  display: none;
}

.kudos {
  display: none;
}

You’ll need to do a bit more work if you want to hide JUST the kudos, but if you are willing to give up the rest of the stats, there you go. 

(Source: arsenicjade)


Photoset

May 16, 2014
@ 11:41 pm
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235 notes

sarking:

[Description: Illustrations of the steps for creating a new mobile skin on the Archive of Our Own.]

Too big? Too small? Whatever the case, if AO3's mobile font size is getting you down, here's how you can change it with the Archive’s skin system and a little CSS.

  1. Log in. If you don’t have an Archive of Our Own account, you can request an invitation.
  2. From the “Hi, user!” menu, choose “My Dashboard.”
  3. From your dashboard, choose “Skins.”
  4. On the My Site Skins page, choose “Create Site Skin.”
  5. Name your skin using the “Title” field. Skin names must be unique.
  6. In the CSS field, enter #outer { font-size: 12px; } (You can use any size you want. It is currently set to 14px and was previously set to 12px.)
  7. Select the Advanced section’s “Show” option.
  8. In the Conditions section, for Media, select “only screen and (max-width: 640px).” Depending on your device, you may also need to select “handheld.”
  9. Select “Submit” to save your skin.
  10. Select “Use” to apply your skin.

Reblogging this super useful tip for mobile AO3 users here! 


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May 2, 2014
@ 10:17 am
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671 notes

The Organization for Transformative Works was founded six years ago, because fans realized that owning the means of circulating and distributing fanworks—the servers, the interface, the code, the terms of service—would be essential to the long-term health of fan creativity, and so we created the nonprofit, donor-supported Archive of Our Own. Today, when I talk about the importance of fan writing, I don’t just mean fiction and nonfiction: I mean contracts and code. In the old days, fans self-published their fiction (and put it under copyright, asserting their ownership in their words), they distributed their own VHS cassettes and digital downloads, and they coded and built their own websites and created their own terms of service. Today, enormous commercial entities—YouTube, Amazon, LiveJournal, Wattpad, Tumblr—own much of this infrastructure.

This is a very mixed bag. On the one hand, these companies’ products and interfaces have made it infinitely easier for the average fan to connect with other fans and distribute fanworks. Now you only need a username and a password to get started, where before you needed access to server space, a knowledge of HTML, how to use FTP, and so on. However, there are also various dangers, including not only capricious or exploitative terms of service but simple market failure. None of the companies I just listed has anything like the track record of the average fandom or fannish institution; consider how much younger they are than Sherlock Holmes, Doctor Who, or even Supernatural fandom. In the best case, these companies may fail and become a disruptive force in relatively stable and long-term communities; in the worst case, they may exploit and betray their users.

In the past few years, the nature of the arguments I have been having as a fandom advocate has changed: In the past, I found myself arguing for the legitimacy of our works; now, I find myself arguing against their exploitation. The commercial ownership of the infrastructure means that money has now complicated fandom’s gift culture, and, like it or not, we now have to think about who should benefit. Here, too, there is a spectrum: Some grassroots creators don’t want to engage with the commercial world on any terms (and they should have the right not to); others feel that if someone is profiting from their works, it should be them, and it should be a fair compensation. If the relationship between fans and the commercial world is being renegotiated, we’re going to have to apply some of our creative energies to writing contracts as well as fanfiction, rather than let unfavorable or disrespectful terms of authorship be handed down to us by corporate owners.

Francesca Coppa, in Participations: Dialogues on the Participatory Promise of Contemporary Culture and Politics (via fanculturesfancreativity)

This. This is the new battle line, and large sections of fandom and fan studies have been swept right over it without even realizing there’s something to contest.

(via cathexys)

(via rivkat)


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Apr 22, 2014
@ 8:52 pm
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501 notes

flamingmuse:

Dear AO3,

Thank you for existing.  I remember when you didn’t, and fannish life is so much better with such a robust and well-stocked archive.  You’re the first place I go when I’m looking for fic in a new fandom, and I’m always shocked when I go looking for a beloved old fic and it isn’t there because it was written back in the olden days when we all had our own web sites scattered across the internet, all of them able to vanish in an instant at the whim of an ISP.

So thank you for giving us a home. <3

fm.

p.s. Dear fans, please upload your older works to the AO3, too!

Seconding this request so much! <3

My tips for importing older stories en masse even if you have loads of them and it seems like a massive job!

- import all your stories in fandom/pairing batches (you can import up to 25 works at once)

- ticky the “Set the following tags on all works, overriding whatever the importer finds.”

- if the stories don’t all have the same rating/warnings, then tag them all with Not Rated, Choose Not To Warn. If all your stories are in the same fandom/pairing, tag for that also.  

- under additional tags stick in ”imported” (or whatever similar tag you want to use for your own stuff).

- tidy up the imported stories and their tags one by one whenever time allows. (Once nice option: fix them up as you get kudos or comments on them.) When you do, take the “imported” tag off. (I like to add on “backdated” in its place so I remember it was posted elsewhere first.)

This is IMO the best way to get your stories preserved — the most important thing is to get the content up there on the archive. If people see a tag like “imported” then they will understand that the story came from elsewhere and if there are issues that make it hard to read, often they’ll tell you in a comment, and that is a happy-making incentive to fix that story up. :)

(via heresluck)


Link

Mar 17, 2014
@ 6:49 pm
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88,038 notes

http://meganmanhand.tumblr.com/post/79908336478/frozen-timelord-reinnervations »

frozen-timelord:

reinnervations:

fuckyeahcommunity:

anigrrrl2:

nonlinear-nonsubjective:

candiedtyphoon:

argentknights:

SOPA IS BACK. I REPEAT THIS IS NOT JOKE. 

SOPA is not back. Please check the EFF action page before posting/reblogging stuff like this — spamming people when it’s not true makes it harder to spread the word when something really serious DOES happen and we really need to muster collective action. 

What WOULD be useful right now (this is March 2014 as I write this) would be going to the EFF action page and asking your reps in Congress to vote against renewal of the Trade Promotion Authority, which could cause bad provisions that the Administration writes into trade agreements to become law without Congressional oversight. 

(via stephenfrys)


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Mar 16, 2014
@ 9:42 pm
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116 notes

transformativeworks:

SOPA is not back but there are efforts to expand copyright afoot. Learn how you can help &amp; who to call: http://bit.ly/1gCFuuw

transformativeworks:

SOPA is not back but there are efforts to expand copyright afoot. Learn how you can help & who to call: http://bit.ly/1gCFuuw

(via ao3org)


Link

Jan 28, 2014
@ 8:22 pm
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39 notes

A Rare Invitation To Help Shape European Copyright Law | Techdirt »

rivkat:

European fans!  From what I can tell, this is a serious opportunity to weigh in and argue for a right to make transformative, noncommercial works.  Apparently sometimes sheer numbers do matter.  Questions 40-44 deal with “user-generated content,” including fanworks, and you don’t have to answer other questions—you can just answer those.

Further from Techdirt: “Navigating this can be daunting, so a broad coalition has put together a site called youcan.fixcopyright.eu. It is designed to offer a quick way of selecting groups of questions that are most likely to be of interest to specific kinds of respondents — for example, online users, teachers, parents, bloggers, etc.”

Just writing about why we should have the right to make transformative works could have real effects.  Please consider giving it a moment of your time!

Reblogging for great justice! :) EU fans, please give it a look!


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Jan 27, 2014
@ 3:31 pm
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172 notes

transformativeworks:

Former OTW board member Naomi Novik will be testifying before the U.S. House Judiciary Jan 28 on behalf of fans: http://bit.ly/1mOCaQn

FYI, you can read my written testimony on the Judiciary Committee&#8217;s website now. The other members of the panel and their testimony are all also linked at the hearing page, The Scope of Fair Use. 

transformativeworks:

Former OTW board member Naomi Novik will be testifying before the U.S. House Judiciary Jan 28 on behalf of fans: http://bit.ly/1mOCaQn

FYI, you can read my written testimony on the Judiciary Committee’s website now. The other members of the panel and their testimony are all also linked at the hearing page, The Scope of Fair Use


Text

Jan 23, 2014
@ 9:39 pm
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105 notes

What’s up with the recent downtimes?

ao3org:

If you’re a regular Archive visitor or if you follow our AO3_Status Twitter account, you may have noticed that we’ve experienced a number of short downtime incidents over the last few weeks. Here’s a brief explanation of what’s happening and what we’re doing to fix things, mirrored from the AO3 News post.

The issue

Every now and then, the volume of traffic we get and the amount of data we’re hosting starts to hit the ceiling of what our existing infrastructure can support. We try to plan ahead and start making improvements in advance, but sometimes things simply catch up to us a little too quickly, which is what’s happening now.

The good news is that we do have fixes in the works: we’ve ordered some new servers, and we hope to have them up and running soon. We’re making plans to upgrade our database system to a cluster setup that will handle failures better and support more traffic; however, this will take a little longer. And we’re working on a number of significant code fixes to improve bottlenecks and reduce server load - we hope to have the first of those out within the next two weeks.

One area that’s affected are the number of hits, kudos, comments, and bookmarks on works, so you may see delays in those updating, as well as issues with the “Date Updated” sorting on bookmark pages.

Behind the scenes

We apologize to everyone who’s been affected by these sudden outages, and we’ll do our best to minimize the disruption as we work on making things better! We do have an all-volunteer staff, so while we try to respond to server problems quickly, sometimes they happen when we’re all either at work or asleep, so we can’t always fix things as soon as we’d like to.

While we appreciate how patient and supportive most Archive users are, please keep in mind that tweets and support requests go to real people who may find threats of violence or repeated expletives aimed at them upsetting. Definitely let us know about problems, but try to keep it to language you wouldn’t mind seeing in your own inbox, and please understand if we can’t predict immediately how long a sudden downtime might take.

The future

Ultimately, we need to keep growing and making things work better because more and more people are using AO3 each year, and that’s something to be excited about. December and January tend to bring a lot of activity to the site - holiday gift exchanges are posted or revealed, people are on vacation, and a number of fandoms have new source material.

We’re looking forward to seeing all the new fanworks that people create this year, and we’ll do our best to keep up with you! And if you’re able to donate or volunteer your time, that’s a huge help, and we’re always thrilled to hear from you.


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Dec 18, 2013
@ 8:56 am
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294 notes

rivkat:

Suggestion: Donate to A03 (OTW)

daltongraham:

mildredandbobbin:

I saw this suggestion on twitter (sorry I can’t find it again) but then got distracted by wank and never got to post it yesterday. If you are outraged/upset/irritated/miffed or just generally put out by what Caitlin Moran did with a piece of fanfiction at the BFI premiere, how about donating to…

What she said.

Also you can donate by buying a copy of _Fic: Why Fanfiction Is Taking Over the World_ by Anne Jamison, who has defended mildredandbobbin, and includes an essay by Atlin Merrick, another defender and awesome ficwriter. _Fic_ is an incredibly important book because it makes us legit. It is a paper-and-ink, published book that can now be referenced in scholarly papers which, at least in academia, is huge. Also, it’s fun to read and if you use the link above, part of the proceeds go straight to OTW (which runs AO3). 

Obviously I love the donation suggestion, and I’m very pleased by the success of Fic.  But fan studies has been around for decades as an academic subdiscipline!  Here are over 1700 academic works in the field (thanks, Nele Noppe!).  Since we are working in a highly feminized field, our history can easily be lost—it’s one of the things Joanna Russ mentions in How to Suppress Women’s Writing, that it’s really easy to present a work/an artist as the only one of its/her kind rather than as part of a tradition, and that this erasure marginalizes female artists.  

Summary: if that’s your standard for legitimacy, we’ve been legit for a while!


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Sep 30, 2013
@ 3:57 pm
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65 notes

transformativeworks:

Want to help create the AO3? We need coders, tag wranglers &amp; strategic planners. http://bit.ly/19R9lxf

Please reblog and consider volunteering, especially if you&#8217;re an experienced coder!
Here&#8217;s the coder application form in particular that lists the skills needed &#8212; if you have at least one please consider jumping in the pool! (And btw Ruby is a super fun language to work in and easy to pick up if you&#8217;ve never tried!)

transformativeworks:

Want to help create the AO3? We need coders, tag wranglers & strategic planners. http://bit.ly/19R9lxf

Please reblog and consider volunteering, especially if you’re an experienced coder!

Here’s the coder application form in particular that lists the skills needed — if you have at least one please consider jumping in the pool! (And btw Ruby is a super fun language to work in and easy to pick up if you’ve never tried!)


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May 6, 2013
@ 4:14 pm
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1,424 notes

Ao3 is one of TIME's 50 best websites of 2013 »

erindizmo:

corpsereviver2:

Link is to full list.
But wow, Ao3 gets a positive mention for being well organized. Also, way to not mock fanfic, TIME.

Eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

(And the AO3’s specific slideshow slide is right here if you wanna jump right to it.)

I am ridiculously jazzed about this.

I might be a little bit proud about this. :)

(via cesperanza)


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Apr 6, 2013
@ 2:55 pm
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2,646 notes

Guys, if you haven&#8217;t already read about how much it costs to run the AO3, please do, and then please donate. 
Ultimately, the archive can only survive if we want it enough to pay for it with our donations. That&#8217;s the flip side of having a service that isn&#8217;t dependent on making advertisers or venture capitalists or even grant-funders happy, that isn&#8217;t going to mine and sell your personal data, and that isn&#8217;t going to charge you up front to use it.
If you love the archive, please support it!

Guys, if you haven’t already read about how much it costs to run the AO3, please do, and then please donate. 

Ultimately, the archive can only survive if we want it enough to pay for it with our donations. That’s the flip side of having a service that isn’t dependent on making advertisers or venture capitalists or even grant-funders happy, that isn’t going to mine and sell your personal data, and that isn’t going to charge you up front to use it.

If you love the archive, please support it!


Link

Apr 5, 2013
@ 9:59 pm
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77 notes

Small Calibrations: Important things the world needs »

minim-calibre:

An AO3 version of the Tumblr H8 button or Tumblr Savior.

Or, you know, for me to be able to scroll past things without grinding my teeth.

But the former seems, much as it’s a pipe dream, easier to accomplish than the latter.

I mean, I’m almost 39, so we’re talking almost four decades of…

AO3 savior

You have to edit the top of the script to put in your blacklist (this is much easier than it sounds, it’s pretty obvious when you look at the file).  

If you’re using Chrome, you have to save the script on your desktop, open your Extensions page, and drag the script in there. 


Text

Mar 30, 2013
@ 7:34 pm
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2 notes

esteefee replied to your photoset: AO3 series tip/suggestion! I have started doing a…

I like the Author’s Favorites idea, but, e.g., I have a 146 stories in SGA alone. That’s a helluva lot of work when readers can just click on the already existent sort link (works?fandom_id=70) and get them all that way. Unless I’m missing something?

The reason I prefer the per-fandom series is it’s a single click from the first story to get to another story, where otherwise (especially if an author has a lot of fandoms) then to get the next story, you have to click to the profile, then expand the list, then get to the work index, then pick a story.

Also in that kind of case (a fandom with TONS of stories), I would also love something like an “Author’s SGA Favorites”. :)

The broader point is more, I think it’s useful to use series as a way of curating your own stories for readers, and to help guide readers from one of your stories to others.